Snapchat: A Thing for the Kids?

Snapchat-Luxor-Hotel-Photo

29 Jan Snapchat: A Thing for the Kids?

It’s safe to assume that in 2016, most of us recognise Snapchat’s notorious mascot standing front and centre in the midst of our digital world. It’s also fair to assume that no one in the over-40 crowd has a clue what the faceless white ghost is, or where it’s come from.

So what are Evan Spiegel and his 330-team members doing about it? Here’s the low-down so far.

Jeremy Liew, one of the platforms investors, noted at a conference last year that he’s seen pickup among parents of Snapchat’s users, and recent figures comply.

As reported in the Los Angeles Times, over the last year in the U.S., Snapchat added 25-to-34-year-old users and older-than-35 users faster than 18-to-24-year-old users. And, Snapchat’s own data now peg 12% of its nearly 50 million daily users in the U.S. as 34 to 54.

According to Enrique Velasco-Castillo, senior analyst at research firm Analysys Mason, older consumers have higher incomes, which is attractive to advertisers, hence why in December, Snapchat stuck a huge poker-chip-shaped banner on the Luxor hotel in Las Vegas. Savvy, right?

Ad’s are fundamental to Snapchat’s profits, so it’s in their best interests to keep the older generation interested, and with people aged 35-44 spending the most time on their smartphones each month, it’s looking promising.

Three weeks ago, Snapchat launched a partnership with the Wall Street Journal. Older consumers are likely to prefer topics or stories that come from people their own age, and this is a good start, not forgetting the news channels that are already present. It’s also been reported that adults like the self-destructing chat feature and the idea of a small network of friends.

Aside from this, Snapchat really just wants to be a household name, and the roadside billboards in Seattle, Oakland, Tampa and so on might not lead to thousands of downloads from the older generation, but they are certainly starting to raise questions and welcome those “yellow ghost billboard” searches over at Google.com

Let’s all remember that when Facebook launched, it was aimed at college students, and now, their demographic couldn’t be more different. If Facebook’s success is anything to go by, our grandmother’s might be watching our drunk Snapchat stories sooner than we’d like to think.